Wednesday, August 9, 2017

On the Mentors, a banned band

Punk culture in general has long thought of itself as a place where the unwelcome are welcome, where outsiders, misfits, nonconformists, and failures can find a community, a home. Because of this, punk sometimes catches things in its wide net that go against what is thought of as punk itself. Here we have to be careful, because although punk is often thought of as lefty, rebellious, nonconformist, even unAmerican (whatever that means), etc., it has some interesting players: a pro-Republican member of punk legend The Misfits, Darby Crash of The Germs advocating for fascism as the best means of social order, controversial anti-homosexuality in some of the music of bad brains, the singer of Fang strangling his girlfriend to death, and, ah... The Mentors.

 
An interesting meta-level Mentors logo, from their Facebook page, in which they appropriate another punk band's (Dirty Rotten Imbeciles) logo for their own

The Mentors formed in the late 1970s -- as the feminist movement, after seeing civil rights movements before it and the social protests and upheavals of the 1960s, began to voice their own discontents -- and certainly are, without question, a punk band with street cred. They have done extensive touring and survived the test of time, even after losing their leader, Eldon Hoke (aka El Duce) in a bizarre accident in which he walked across some railroad tracks to greet fans, got his foot stuck in the tracks, and was struck and killed by a train.*

They have weathered controversy and even government harassment/scrutiny during the Parent Music Resource Center trials of the 1980s; they also very openly invite controversy. And, perhaps most evocatively and disturbingly, they play what they call (here's a two-word Trump-esque zinger) "rape rock," in which they make music and create an aesthetic about the denigration and objectifying of women.

Mentors-Nirvana connection

When rock journalists posit that much of Pacific Northwest grunge bands were rooted in feminism (even all-male bands) rather than the "pale and male" 2nd wave of American hardcore who often -- unintentionally, I hope -- marginalized women and people of color, I'd have to slightly disagree. The Mentors are from Seattle, for one, and are connected to much punk rock/rock in general, like the underbelly of a more "wholesome" or well-known, mainstream scene. There is even a weird Mentors-Nirvana connection that you can explore on yr own, ripe with a conspiracy theory that El Duce was asked by Courtney Love to kill Kurt Cobain for $10,000. (I suspect it's conspiracy theory BS, but, interestingly, El Duce passed a lie detector test when asked about his claim, if we assume lie detector tests are reliable. Which they aren't.) If Nirvana was Establishment Grunge, the Mentors (or at least El Duce) was the Mafia. The two are natural partners.

I first remember learning about the Mentors when a friend in high school showed me an album. 3 white dudes in black executioner hoods, a general vibe of both misogyny, parody, and an obvious love of the (dominated, sexually objectified) female form (thus an anti-gay sentiment, as well). A certain sleaziness I recognized from growing up in the era of Grindhouse cinema. The executioner hoods were intriguing because they certainly, when worn by white people, bring to mind the KKK, but the hoods were black, and executioner hoods pre-date the Klan.**

So what have we got? 1980s hair-farmer band groupies at the altar of the Mentors. Note how it's just "mentors", not unlike (the) melvins, the latter whom were probably influenced by the former. Also note the "beef curtain" vinyl. 

"Rape rock" 
 
I've never been real into the Mentors, although I appreciate that they have exercised their 1st Amendment Rights (use 'em or lose 'em, folks), stirred the pot without running away from it, stuck to their guns, and served as the dark side to punk's more noble side. (The whole yin-yang thang....) They exist in that universe that's home to GG Allin and the Murder Junkies, where sleaze and drugs and white trash and deviant sex and violence and punk music all blend. It's not my favorite place, but it is interesting. I'm not real crazy about any thing or any one who seriously -- without complexity, irony, parody, or intelligence -- advocates rape. Because although I believe in humor and I believe in art being important humanistic forms of dealing with taboo topics, rape is far too common in our culture, and does incredible psychological damage.

We can all throw the term "anti" around
 
The Mentors are currently on an "Anti-Antifa Tour" (antifa = antifascism, often associated with violent Black Bloc techniques), and I think there's room in this world for us all. The Left often takes itself far too seriously (the South Park episode where Prius drivers smell their own farts, satisfyingly), so I do appreciate an "anti" movement to something that's already "anti-." It's clever. It makes people think.


Gilman Street in Berkeley is a legendary punk venue -- I lived in Oakland for years, but never somehow went -- but they tend to ban things that don't fit with their beliefs, including Green Day (?!). Unsurprisingly, Gilman St. banned the Mentors, but it did warm my heart that my old hangout, Eli's Mile High Club in a frankly sketchy part of Oakland***, was willing to host them. 
Not sure if I'm getting more conservative as I age, but I'm not so sure the Mentors defending their rape rock, in an era of Trumpian pussy-grabbing, rape culture, and white male-emboldening, is the most ethical or strategic move. (I also have reservations about Eli Roth remaking white vigilantism movie Death Wish. Come on, Mr. Roth: social responsibility!) But ultimately I am a defender of the 1st Amendment over pretty much anything/everything, and as I said I like when liberal taboos are challenged, especially if there is a complexity to the stew involving parody, theatrics, and button-pushing, which I suspect there is with the Mentors.

I am troubled by the Mentors posting a fan letter they got from a 13-year old male fan who hand-wrote (in bad handwriting, natch) to them saying "rape rock is where it's at." Does an average 13-year old know the nuance of parody, theatrics, and shit-stirring over what is explicit and face value? Then again, I wasn't but 16 or so when I first encountered the Mentors, but I'd been raised exposed to controversial things by parents who believed in free-range parenting and trusted my maturity level (perhaps over-trusting it at times, but there are worse flaws to have). As filmmaker Scott Derrickson said, it's better to have youth experience adult/edgy things and then have a thoughtful conversation about what they experienced, rather than banning things, creating taboos, and sheltering/mollycoddling. One close look at the Millennial Generation and you can see the effects of some very questionable parenting. They've just been too sheltered.

Hell, we live in a time when the President of the Fucking United States of America was caught talking like a frat-boy rapist about women. Slavoj Zizek might argue that there is an honesty, however repulsive, in Trump that's lacking in a corporate Democrat like Hillary Clinton, but it's been sad seeing, post-election, how people on the street have been emboldened in their backlash racism and sexism against vulnerable peoples.

Conclusion 

I guess "inna final analysis" I have to side with Frank Zappa, who was read Mentors lyrics during the PMRC trials and found the whole thing rather farcical and a bit creepy -- creepy in what the government was doing, not the Mentors. A wide-net thing like punk, in a free market society like capitalism offers, is going to turn up fish like the Mentors. You don't have to like them. You don't have to listen to them. You don't have to agree with them. You don't have to worship at the Church of El Duce (a real thing) or even go once. But it is our fringe-dwellers, our boundary-pushers, our controversynauts, who we need to both listen to, defend, and engage in healthy discussion -- and disagreement -- with.
Do I think women should be picked up, sexually used/abused, then "dropped off at Jack in the Box," as the Mentors believe (or are playing a role and saying they believe)? Of course not. But as Zizek noted, there is something fishy and duplicitous about Hillary Clinton -- he likened her being a "progressive" to Lehmen Bros or Goldman-Sachs sponsoring Occupy Wall Street -- and with Trump, or the Mentors, however revolting: WYSIWYG. I'd rather have a guy wear a swastika tattoo on his face and be upfront about it, than learn that a captain of industry or someone with immense political/institutional power is secretly a raging racist or misogynist. I can protect the women in my life from those who act openly, like the Mentors; I'm more worried about the frat-boys who appear on the outside to be decent and wholesome but are internally far more sinister.

Is it the most socially responsible what the Mentors do? No. Is it inevitable? Perhaps. If they don't do it, will someone else? Probably. Are the Mentors hiding behind the First Amendment? No, I think they're utilizing it; that's what it's there for. Do someone like the Mentors strengthen the First Amendment? Ultimately, yes.



* This story comes from Ministry's Al Jourgensen, who strikes me as an honest guy, but who also has no memory of recording certain Ministry albums due to drug abuse/addiction; the official cause of El Duce's death is the weird "misadventure."

** In doing some research, apparently the well-known image of the hooded executioner is largely a myth; actual executioners throughout history did not wear hoods.

*** I once walked home after a show at Eli's and was offered both sex from a hooker and crack from a dealer on the same block. I politely refused both. Eli's started as a small club where Blacks from the South who came to the Bay Area to help build ships for the war (WW2) effort could hear Blues and other traditionally-African-American musicians play. Over the years it mutated into a punk/metal/alternative club with a different crowd.

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